Please read the RULES tab completely.  The rules apply to both CATS and FAST CATS

 

Coursing Ability Tests

SECTION 1. PURPOSE. The purpose of the AKC Coursing Ability Test is to provide all dogs and their owners an enjoyable, healthy activity in which they can participate. Based on the sport of lure coursing, Coursing Ability Tests will serve as an introduction to the sport for all eligible dog owners. Dogs run singularly and are required to complete their course with enthusiasm and without interruption within a maximum amount of time. The Coursing Ability Test is a pass–fail event. 

The CAT test is a 300, 400 or 600 yard course set up to test the ability of the all breed dog to "course" .  The 300 yard is set for those dogs listed as brachycephalic or 12 inches at the withers.  The 400 yard course is for the Veteran runners that are over 12 inches and those under 12 can run 200 yards.  The 600 yard course is for the taller dogs.

SECTION 10. COLLAR/PARAPHERNALIA. Dogs may wear any collar except a choker collar, a collar with prongs or an electronic training collar. The collar should be snug to minimize the chances of getting hung up on something during the run. The event committee may, at its discretion, require securing the tags with tape or something similar to ensure the dog’s safety. Owners should be aware that there is a chance that tags hanging from the collar could become entangled on something during the run. If owners are concerned, tags may be taped to the collar. Owners may use clips or rubber bands to hold the dog’s hair. The owner assumes responsibility for the safety of the dog with regard to the dog’s collar and paraphernalia on the dog. 

Three titles will be awarded for dogs that pass the Coursing Ability Test the required number of times. These are suffix titles that will appear on a dog’s pedigree with a higher level title superseding a lower level title. Coursing Ability (CA) – Awarded to a dog that passes the Coursing Ability Test three times under at least two different judges. Coursing Ability Advanced (CAA) – Dog passes the Coursing Ability Test a total of ten times. (CA+7 additional passes) Coursing Ability Excellent (CAX) – Dog passes the Coursing Ability Test a total of 25 times. Coursing Ability Excellent 2 (CAX2) – Dog passes the Coursing Ability Test a total of 50 times. A higher numbered title will be awarded for every additional twenty five passes. 

 

FAST CAT

The purpose of the AKC Fast CAT event is to provide all dogs and their owners an enjoyable, healthy activity in which they can participate. Dogs run singularly. The dog’s time to complete the 100 yard dash is converted into MPH. Dogs earn points based on their handicapped speed. Titles are awarded when a dog has accumulated a given number of points. 

There is a handicap for dogs 12 inches and under, 12-18 inches and over 18 inches.

Titles are earned by accumulating points. The following titles will be awarded: BCAT = 150 Points; DCAT = 500 points; FCAT = 1,000 points; and FCAT followed by a number (e.g. FCAT2) for every additional 500 points. These suffix titles will appear on a dog’s pedigree, with a higher level title superseding a lower level title. TOP 20 DOGS BY BREED BY YEAR. National rankings showing the top 20 fastest times in MPH by breed for a calendar year will be maintained on the Fast CAT website. These rankings will be automatically updated as results are processed.  

There has been much discussion and much incorrect assumption as to how the FAST CAT field is to be set up.  The following is taken right from the AKC guide for FAST CATs:

SECTION 10. COURSE/EQUIPMENT. A. Safety: Safety is of utmost importance. It is the responsibility of the event committee to insure the safety of the course, the equipment and the conduct of those involved with the event. It is recommended that the event committee run a test dog prior to the start of the event to ensure that the equipment functions properly and all personnel understand their jobs. Prior to moving the lure to position it for the start, the lure operator shall announce “hold your dogs” in order to caution owners. B. The Start: Dogs may start up to 10 feet behind the starting line. C. The Finish: The club must provide enough room for a safe run-out area. It is required this be a minimum of 30 yards and suggested the run out be 50 yards. The club should consider fencing the end of the course in order to help collect the dogs. It is recommended that an owner or someone familiar with the dog stand at the finish in order to catch the dog once the course has been completed. D. Timing Devices: The time to complete the 100 yard dash is recorded to the nearest 1/100th of a second (e.g. 9.11). The club may use stopwatches or break-the-beam equipment to obtain the time. If stopwatches are used, there shall be two timers positioned at the finish line. An individual at the start line shall signal with an arm drop the moment the nose of the dog crosses the start line. The timers shall start their stopwatches at the bottom of 40 the arm drop. The timers shall stop their watches when the nose of the dog crosses the finish line. The times from the two stopwatches shall be averaged to determine the recorded time.

G. Course/Fencing: The course must be essentially flat. The club should consider fencing the course area, however this is up to the decision of the club given the specifics of the setting. The premium should state if the location of the event is enclosed with fencing. 

And if you have any questions, those working the desk will gladly answer your questions and help you.